Garden Reading

reading garden magazineGarden Reading is the traditional way to kick off Spring Gardening. Winter gardens are becoming more and more popular, but most folks still wait until they can do some spring gardening. So, while the earth is still gripped in ice and snow, now is the time for doing plant research as well as other kinds of garden research. How to videos are always great. Garden video, such as is offered in the Living Garden Series, is easy to relate to. Either way, if you’re like me, most of what you’re reading and researching pertains to gardening.
Garden Reading is not to be taken lightly. I’m serious. The way I see it, reading garden materials and researching other gardening aspects is the first important step to achieving success in the coming year’s gardening season.
There’s a whole garden of reading, to turn a phrase. So, what should a gardener be looking for when they consider their garden reading? (Personally, I’d like to read about creating Reading Gardens, but we’ll tackle that another time.)
Well, there’s any number of books. Many manufacturers of garden products, as well as those offering gardening services, have sponsored the publishing of home and garden books. Promoting a “how to” book about vegetable gardening was good business for Troy-Bilt. It helped them sell more power equipment.
If you’re like most folks, not all of your gardening endeavors will be entirely successful. Things go wrong. It may be a big thing or it may be a little thing. It’s perfectly natural. How to garden books can be a big help and companies know it.
Ortho, which specializes in producing insecticides, sponsored the publishing of a book. It’s only natural to assume that most folks who garden will acquire some sort of pest problem along the way. Sponsoring gardener’s books that promote your product as the solution to garden insect problems would be a good way to sell more insecticides.
The point is to be aware of who published the horticulture book you’re reading. While it may be an excellent source of information, when it comes to some aspects, such as tilling the land or dealing with insects, the book may be a bit “biased” about making use of certain products.
Some gardeners never till their ground with a power machine. Would you expect a book sponsored by a power garden implement maker to mention such an alternative gardening method? Would Ortho mention natural insect control methods?
Seed catalogs are excellent reading. I’ve always found it fascinating how one seed catalog can offer a product called by a certain name while another catalog offers the exact same thing, only calls it something else. Is this artistic liberty, pride of ownership or selfless promotion? It doesn’t matter, really. What does matter is that you know the characteristics of the plants you’re interested in and have faith in your seed supplier.
Of course, figuring this out can be like breaking a code. Have you ever examined all the terms and abbreviations that make up the description of a tomato variety? It all makes sense once it’s pointed out to you, but who can do that? Once again, I’m going to refer to Jane Jensen and the “Living Garden Series”. Through her video, she offers a more in-depth explanation than I could attempt in this text. If you’re like me, seeing the video will be the better form of instruction. Check out the Living Garden Series and see for yourself.
Best of luck with all your Garden Reading.


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